Social TV Week in Review: News Recap

The news this week… Read the rest of this entry »

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Social TV Week In Review: Death of TV / Life of Web

Another week with plenty of articles forecasting the ‘death of TV’ and as many authors offering their impassioned ripostes. For all this talk of ‘death’, the must read stories of the week talk about ‘life’, or rather the ‘life of Web’. In the multiplatform magazine, Sparksheet, Aymar Jean Christian, an assistant professor of communication in the Media, Technology and Society program at Northwestern University writes, “Viewership for high-budget web shows is growing”. He is quick to temper that assessment by admitting, awareness is still low, but Daniel Leff, a partner at a technology-focused venture capital firm, raises awareness in an All Things D article that suggests, “DecaTV, Awesomeness TV, Machinima, Filmon and others are essentially growing up as Internet TV networks”.

For more news, including stories of Felix Baumgartner’s record breaking jump (8 million concurrent streams!) and an OpenSlate study finding the top 1,000 channels on YouTube already bring in $23,000 a month in revenue, please read on! Read the rest of this entry »


Social TV Week In Review: The News ( + Voices of Dissent)

This week’s must read news items:

  1. Somrat Niyogi, founder of Miso, critiques the nascent social TV industry’s focus claiming, “We make it about the people in business, not a business for people” . Deriding the  overextended focus of companion viewing services, he suggests companies concentrate on one value proposition and deliver it well.
  2. Chuck Parker, Chairman at Second Screen Society, offers a direct rebuttal. Parker turns to Apple as a prime example of how a company takes many diverse services (inherent in smart-phones) and condenses them into a singular, intuitive product.
  3. Jeff Schroer, co-founder of iBubblr, weighs in: “Strong content and the first-screen experience are still king. What consumers want are better ways to enjoy what they love. It really is that simple.”
  4. John Funge, cofounder and CEO of BrightContext talks about the “modern problem of “’real-time big data’”. He too calls for more differentiation and ‘ambition’ from second screen players.
  5. MarketsandMarkets projects social TV growth from $151.14 billion this year, to $256.44 billion by 2017.
  6. Nicholas Barr takes apart that projection line by line. 

There’s much more happening in the news this week. As always, keep reading for all the latest stories! Read the rest of this entry »


Social TV Week in Review: The News! (+ Great Pros & Cons)

Can TV go social without being ruined? asks The Next Web. What if Social TV Is Less Social Than We Think? questions All Things D. What about The Two Biggest Hurdles Social TV Still Needs to Overcome? Ad Age wonders. If you need convincing, try letting Simon Mainwaring explain Why social media is critical to the future of TV. Allow MediaPost to assure you that the Future Of TV Looks Bright Thanks To Social Media. And if you’re still not sold let Social Media Week help you count the 5 Ways Social Media Is Improving Television.

For these and other great stories, please keep reading! Read the rest of this entry »


Social TV Week in Review: Times Are A Changin’

If you’re tuned in to the TV space there are a lot of great things to watch. More and more, networks are releasing their shows early or exclusively via online platforms (The Mindy Project on Hulu, Ben and Kate on Facebook, Smash on iTunes, Suit Up on Yahoo!, Raising Hope on Twitter etc.). Á la Alan Wurtzel’s ‘billion-dollar Olympic experiment’, many are betting that the online buzz from the type A viewer will drive ratings around linear debuts. It’s an interesting new delivery model that has networks testing their limits in the digital age.

The traditional networks aren’t the only ones experimenting…

Amazon, YouTube, Netflix, Hulu, even Xbox and Nintendo, are all looking to create their own content and move it across their own channels. When Netflix launched Lilly Hammer they didn’t just release a single episode premiere, they dumped the entire season online, all in one go. Companies like Netflix don’t have to play by the same rules as ad supported networks, nor do they have to mimic subscription cable services such as HBO.

It doesn’t stop at delivery…

As new players enter the space, they continue to shake up the establishment at all levels. YouTube’s director of product management, Shiva Rajaraman, suggests the 15 or 30-second spot is an anachronism of traditional TV. Branded content? Incentivized engagement? – are these the tools of the new marketer?

Apps are fanning the flames…

According to Adweek a new app called Matcha, “has already partnered with Netflix, iTunes, Hulu and Comcast’s Xfinity to provide users with access to 200,000 movie and TV titles they can elect to watch on the big screen or in some cases within the app itself”. When the networks and larger companies leave consumers wanting more, nimble start-ups rush to fill the gaps. Second screen experiences are moving beyond check-ins and sharing, to now offering discovery, recommendation, personalization and even their own original content.

For more of the latest and greatest news, keep reading!  Read the rest of this entry »


Social TV Week In Review: Social TV Review

Take a look at a few of the headlines this week: Cablevision experiments with ‘communal television viewing’; Nintendo and Xbox dabble with TV delivery and interactive content production; Samsung to award $300,000 in the first ‘Second Screen Storytellers initiative’; Shazam applies its audio content recognition technology to TV, etc, etc. Technology is rapidly transforming the media landscape and everyone (from cable operators, to information technology companies to gaming and mobile app developers) is vying for a position in a still undefined space.

Let’s not forget about the broadcast and cable networks themselves!

New research from Avid and Ovum upholds, “75% of media executives believe online, social and mobile platforms actually drive audiences to watch more television content”. Marc DeBevoise, SVP-general manager at CBS Interactive, Peter Naylor, NBC Universal’s exec VP-digital media sales, and Jesse Redniss, SVP of digital for the USA Network, are among the outspoken executives who would likely corroborate Avid and Ovums findings.

So where does that leave Social TV?

In the modern age of television, traditional measurement systems struggle to adapt to the changing environment, but Social TV is well positioned against the chaos. Social data measurement is inherently a cross platform measurement; social data is collected across all screens and devices – it applies to live, recorded, VOD and streamed media alike. The social conversation is happening 24/7 and therefore measurement never really stops. All of this makes social data well defended against fragmentation and invaluable as a real-time, 360-degree evaluation of how viewers are responding to the programs they watch and the networks behind them.

There are some who dismiss Social TV as a trend among younger demographics who aren’t as heavy TV consumers. Yet this younger audience is also tech savvy, influential, vocal and has purchasing power. These characteristics make them some of the strongest and most valuable brand advocates ad money can buy. More importantly they are getting older. Soon millennials will settle into the couch while a new crop of ‘digital natives’ or ‘plurals’ will make them look ancient. Denying the power of Social TV because a generation of TV viewers on their way out hasn’t caught on is as misguided as it is damaging. Social TV is in great position to scale along side an evolving media landscape.

For more news from around the web, keep reading!

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Social TV Week In Review: The News!

Click through to the best of the news this week! Read the rest of this entry »