Social TV Week In Review: Novemember 18

GENERAL NEWS

The Battle For Data From Social TV via Marketing Land

Tens of millions of Americans were still glued to their TV screens (not to mention the countless other millions around the globe); but, at the same time, many millions were furiously tweeting and picking up news from the social platform. And whilst this is great news for Twitter, it highlights growing issues for traditional broadcasters and brands.

‘Social Television’ will become the norm via Cream

Networks that understand the value of real-time interaction are using the social graph to gauge effectiveness of their marketing dollars and understand audience behavior and interests…TV personalities are leveraging social to generate compelling user generated content…Advertisers have also leveraged commercials to drive viewers to their social presence for awareness and promotional activities – often to publish user-generated content or participate in social experiences…To maintain high levels of engagement when primetime television seasons conclude, networks are developing new ways to retain fan relationships through extensions of television.

Social TV has big future, says TV3 via Rapid TV News

In an interview with Rapid TV News Spain, Alex Marquina Doménec, commercial director of New Business and Digital Media at TV3, said he believes that Social TV will cause a change in media consumption habits…The world of television is in the process of transformation, as happened a few years ago with the music industry and the press, but the main difference is the volume of business in the world TV advertising market, close to a 40% share of global investment.

Over the top: the new war for TV is just beginning via The Verge

How is it that you can get a dazzling new smartphone every year with an ever-growing list of features, a better display, and faster networking, but the experience of watching television in your living room remains almost exactly the same as it was five years ago? Why are TV and cable box interfaces so slow and ugly, and why are we still dealing with gigantic ugly cable box remotes festooned with colored buttons? The answer is simple: the only killer app for TV is TV itself. Granted an almost exclusive monopoly over the most valuable content in the living room, cable and satellite companies have developed their products in a competitive vacuum, insulated from the pace and intensity of innovation that has transformed every other part of the tech industry. Smartphones and tablets might have evolved into the apex predators of the technology jungle, but the cable DVR is the mutant fish at the bottom of the ocean that breathes sulfur instead of oxygen. Read the rest of this entry »

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