Social TV Week In Review: November 11

GENERAL NEWS

Simon Staffans: The audience is your channel via MIP Blog

Are you looking for an audience for your content? Or are you perhaps looking to expand the audience of your TV channel? Or are you trying to reach a new demographic, a new audience? You are more than welcome to try achieving those things in the traditional ways, but one thing you have to take into account is a whole new channel that has opened up for everyone – the audience itself…The art lies in creating not only for the people you want to reach, but the people you want them to reach. Namely catering for “friends of friends”, in social media parlance. This is where transmedia storytelling principles can come effectively into play.

Building your brand with content marketing via The Gaurdian

Marketers traditionally think of media strategy in terms of three distinct channels: paid, owned, and earned media. But the lines between these are becoming less defined as earned media becomes increasingly important: that is, media that can’t be bought or controlled by a company itself, generated independently by consumers and third parties – anything from social media to word-of-mouth. And the value of earned media will continue to rise with consumers increasingly looking to non-traditional media outlets for content, seeking out what they’re interested in, rather than passively receiving whatever comes their way from media companies… Coupled with the power of social media, marketers can use video to more closely integrate their strategies for paid, owned and earned media to increase impact and ROI

The Problem With Measuring Digital Influence via TechCrunch

One of the reasons that brands don’t understand digital influence is because they don’t seem to realize that no one actually has any measured “data” on influence (i.e. explicit data that says precisely who actually influenced who, when, where, how, etc.). All influence scores are computed from users’ social activity data based on some models and algorithms of how influence works. However, anyone can create these models and algorithms. So who is right? How can we be sure your influence score is correct? In other words, how can we validate the models that vendors use to predict people’s influence?

vrm: social tv? forget the 2nd screen apps, it’s all about generic data via MetaBroadcast

I just checked on my Twitter and Facebook friends in Zeebox. 3% of the 772 people I follow on Twitter and 6% of my 170 Facebook friends are using the app. Of these, 100% are either working in media, or closely connected to the Zeebox team. More than 80% have previously, or are currently working on 2nd screen projects for a broadcaster. In short, this is still a very niche audience…The reality is that most of this involvement is just unconnected browsing and people communicating about their lives in general, which may or may not be connected to the flickering box in the corner…Twitter is sometimes perceived as a niche medium, but we’re now seeing increased uptake, especially among a younger audience. The realtime nature of Twitter is a major plus for broadcast, which is still a predominantly live experience…”Friction free” logging of TV activity has not taken off as in the music industry, but Facebook contains a rich set of likes and posts around TV shows. We find that most users have between 200 and 2,000 TV likes in their social graph.

The Future of Social TV Metrics via Social Times

The industry is leaning toward having a gross engagement point next to a gross ratings point. But whether this will be a simple number that’s easily digestible or a deeper analysis remains to be seen. In the Q&A portion of the panel, Silverman said some useful metrics include the number of uniques, what the share was, and how they’re trending from one week to the next. Read the rest of this entry »


Social TV Week In Review: Social TV Review

Take a look at a few of the headlines this week: Cablevision experiments with ‘communal television viewing’; Nintendo and Xbox dabble with TV delivery and interactive content production; Samsung to award $300,000 in the first ‘Second Screen Storytellers initiative’; Shazam applies its audio content recognition technology to TV, etc, etc. Technology is rapidly transforming the media landscape and everyone (from cable operators, to information technology companies to gaming and mobile app developers) is vying for a position in a still undefined space.

Let’s not forget about the broadcast and cable networks themselves!

New research from Avid and Ovum upholds, “75% of media executives believe online, social and mobile platforms actually drive audiences to watch more television content”. Marc DeBevoise, SVP-general manager at CBS Interactive, Peter Naylor, NBC Universal’s exec VP-digital media sales, and Jesse Redniss, SVP of digital for the USA Network, are among the outspoken executives who would likely corroborate Avid and Ovums findings.

So where does that leave Social TV?

In the modern age of television, traditional measurement systems struggle to adapt to the changing environment, but Social TV is well positioned against the chaos. Social data measurement is inherently a cross platform measurement; social data is collected across all screens and devices – it applies to live, recorded, VOD and streamed media alike. The social conversation is happening 24/7 and therefore measurement never really stops. All of this makes social data well defended against fragmentation and invaluable as a real-time, 360-degree evaluation of how viewers are responding to the programs they watch and the networks behind them.

There are some who dismiss Social TV as a trend among younger demographics who aren’t as heavy TV consumers. Yet this younger audience is also tech savvy, influential, vocal and has purchasing power. These characteristics make them some of the strongest and most valuable brand advocates ad money can buy. More importantly they are getting older. Soon millennials will settle into the couch while a new crop of ‘digital natives’ or ‘plurals’ will make them look ancient. Denying the power of Social TV because a generation of TV viewers on their way out hasn’t caught on is as misguided as it is damaging. Social TV is in great position to scale along side an evolving media landscape.

For more news from around the web, keep reading!

Read the rest of this entry »


Social TV Week in Review: The Second Screen – Another Challenge or a New Opportunity?

It’s no secret how dependent we’ve become on our computers, phones and tablets. Therefore it should not surprise anyone that we bring these devices into the living room to play and work on while watching TV. This behavior will become more commonplace as devices continue to permeate our lives. Nielsen reports that in just the last year, “smartphone penetration has gone up 34 percent, tablet adoption is up 400 percent”.

The ‘second screen’ (a name bestowed upon any device once it occupies the same room as the TV), has captured the attention of networks and advertisers. According to Videonet, “ITV, the UK’s leading commercial broadcaster, is excited by the potential impact of second screen programme experiences”. Peter Scott of Turner Sports New Media claims, “Advertisers drive us to make a commitment to the second screen”.

So why the excitement? The second screen offers a powerful new medium for delivering content and engaging consumers. In theory, tracking people’s preferences through the Internet and the social graph is now possible on the second screen. This opens the door for greater personalization, or tailoring content to individual consumers. Second screen apps, can offer more targeted, less intrusive ads and even recommend content.

A new study from Thinkbox is one of many seeking to understand the consumer’s second screen behavior. Thinkbox found that additional screens in the living room keep viewers around during ad breaks, encourage more TV watching and do not affect ad recognition. Not all research has been as upbeat.

An NPD study revealed, “70 percent of survey respondents say they’ve watched TV on a device other than a TV”. Although some may use devices to enhance their TV viewing, others are using their devices to replace the first screen entirely. Ashley Swartz, principal of the New York-based consultancy Furious Minds, believes fragmentation across the second screen is a fundamental threat to content owners (See article below).

Tracking ROI from the second screen is another cause for concern. Tammy Franklin, SVP of affiliate sales and new media distribution at Scripps, believes that second screen TV apps today focus on discovery and engagement more so than on advertising revenue. At the 2nd Screen Summit in New York, John Douglas, of digital advertising delivery company DG, explained that second screen campaigns are difficult to compare against traditional ones.

The million-dollar question is, will the second screen provide additive value or will it become a distraction? The answer lies in how networks and advertisers are able to innovate and leverage the second screen.

As always, you can find more on all the Social TV News below (The top 100 advertisers increase spending in unmeasured media, Google lumbers into the TV market and more stories…) Read the rest of this entry »