Social TV Week In Review: December 2

GENERAL NEWS

Social TV Is Getting Down to Business via Ad Age

“No one wants to see a pop-up in the middle of their program they love saying ‘Buy this!'” he said. “The primary screen is not the way to drive the commerce.” Second-screen marketing represents “a way to augment the experience without impacting the experience.” American Express is dabbling in the space to see if it can associate itself with consumers making purchases based on what they see in their favorite TV programs, having signed deals in the last few weeks with both News Corp.’s Fox and Comcast’s NBC Universal…Advertisers “are looking for more interaction” when they do deals that tie them to specific programs, said Jean Rossi, president of News Corp.

American Express Interactive Channel Is Set to Reach 50 Million Homes via New York Times

American Express is taking another step toward the new world of television that is always on, making a deal with BrightLine for a yearlong campaign centered on an interactive branded channel…The branded channel is providing viewers content that includes video clips, offers, games and information about American Express cards and promotions like Small Business Saturday…American Express is among a growing number of giant marketers exploring the ins and outs of interactive television, which appeals to them because ads can be directed at an audience and the results — or lack thereof — measured.

Why the ‘Live Web’ is the new TV via Venture Beat

Is the Live Web bigger than TV?  Absolutely.  First off, the continued progression of TV Everywhere, whereby authenticated subscribers to cable or satellite services have access to their cable video content on most connected devices, is going to result in TV becoming a virtual subset of the Live Web.  This will happen within the next two years…Understanding the Live Web would allows publishers to create digital prime time for their content, create an outlet for content that can’t find a place in their traditional programming wheel, and create a direct and recurring connection with their users instead of leaving the discovery of their content to search.

Somebody Needs To Tell Notre Dame That There’s No ROI On Twitter! via Barry Cunningham

And then it popped up. Right there on Twitter, for all of us wannabe leprechaun’s to see. Someone, maybe Notre Dame, maybe a vendor, but someone with their wits about them somehow owned the top of Twitter and featured Notre Dame gear…While Kirk Herbstreit and Brent Musberger were readying their post-game analysis, somebody was already on it preparing to take millions of dollars of orders. That is the power of #socialtv. That is the power of real-time marketing. That is realizing a serious ROI on Twitter…People are spending tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of dollars on commercials and completely missing the boat on how a simple social media campaign executed in real-time can reap some serious benefits. Both in actual cash and affinity.

Introducing My Revolutionary Social-Media Startup, SocialSocializing via Ad Age [SATIRE]

Well, my killer team and I are hard at work tweaking the interface, and we don’t want to reveal too much quite yet, but basically SocialSocializing, as we’ve named our product, will re-revolutionize the social-media revolution in a revolutionary new fashion that re-engages consumer engagement engagingly. And we’re dong it by getting back to basics.

My next big thing via Fabrizio Capobianco

The iPad mini is the perfect companion to your TV. It is the remote control of the future. At $329, Apple is going to sell a boatloads of them this Christmas…88% of iPad owners use it in front of the TV. People in the US spend almost five hours a day watching TV (ouch 😉 It is still our favorite pastime, by far. All of a sudden, it is possible to talk with your friends, who are watching TV at the same time. It is called Social TV. Read the rest of this entry »


Social TV Week In Review: Novemember 18

GENERAL NEWS

The Battle For Data From Social TV via Marketing Land

Tens of millions of Americans were still glued to their TV screens (not to mention the countless other millions around the globe); but, at the same time, many millions were furiously tweeting and picking up news from the social platform. And whilst this is great news for Twitter, it highlights growing issues for traditional broadcasters and brands.

‘Social Television’ will become the norm via Cream

Networks that understand the value of real-time interaction are using the social graph to gauge effectiveness of their marketing dollars and understand audience behavior and interests…TV personalities are leveraging social to generate compelling user generated content…Advertisers have also leveraged commercials to drive viewers to their social presence for awareness and promotional activities – often to publish user-generated content or participate in social experiences…To maintain high levels of engagement when primetime television seasons conclude, networks are developing new ways to retain fan relationships through extensions of television.

Social TV has big future, says TV3 via Rapid TV News

In an interview with Rapid TV News Spain, Alex Marquina Doménec, commercial director of New Business and Digital Media at TV3, said he believes that Social TV will cause a change in media consumption habits…The world of television is in the process of transformation, as happened a few years ago with the music industry and the press, but the main difference is the volume of business in the world TV advertising market, close to a 40% share of global investment.

Over the top: the new war for TV is just beginning via The Verge

How is it that you can get a dazzling new smartphone every year with an ever-growing list of features, a better display, and faster networking, but the experience of watching television in your living room remains almost exactly the same as it was five years ago? Why are TV and cable box interfaces so slow and ugly, and why are we still dealing with gigantic ugly cable box remotes festooned with colored buttons? The answer is simple: the only killer app for TV is TV itself. Granted an almost exclusive monopoly over the most valuable content in the living room, cable and satellite companies have developed their products in a competitive vacuum, insulated from the pace and intensity of innovation that has transformed every other part of the tech industry. Smartphones and tablets might have evolved into the apex predators of the technology jungle, but the cable DVR is the mutant fish at the bottom of the ocean that breathes sulfur instead of oxygen. Read the rest of this entry »


Social TV Week In Review: Death of TV / Life of Web

Another week with plenty of articles forecasting the ‘death of TV’ and as many authors offering their impassioned ripostes. For all this talk of ‘death’, the must read stories of the week talk about ‘life’, or rather the ‘life of Web’. In the multiplatform magazine, Sparksheet, Aymar Jean Christian, an assistant professor of communication in the Media, Technology and Society program at Northwestern University writes, “Viewership for high-budget web shows is growing”. He is quick to temper that assessment by admitting, awareness is still low, but Daniel Leff, a partner at a technology-focused venture capital firm, raises awareness in an All Things D article that suggests, “DecaTV, Awesomeness TV, Machinima, Filmon and others are essentially growing up as Internet TV networks”.

For more news, including stories of Felix Baumgartner’s record breaking jump (8 million concurrent streams!) and an OpenSlate study finding the top 1,000 channels on YouTube already bring in $23,000 a month in revenue, please read on! Read the rest of this entry »


Social TV Week In Review: The News ( + Voices of Dissent)

This week’s must read news items:

  1. Somrat Niyogi, founder of Miso, critiques the nascent social TV industry’s focus claiming, “We make it about the people in business, not a business for people” . Deriding the  overextended focus of companion viewing services, he suggests companies concentrate on one value proposition and deliver it well.
  2. Chuck Parker, Chairman at Second Screen Society, offers a direct rebuttal. Parker turns to Apple as a prime example of how a company takes many diverse services (inherent in smart-phones) and condenses them into a singular, intuitive product.
  3. Jeff Schroer, co-founder of iBubblr, weighs in: “Strong content and the first-screen experience are still king. What consumers want are better ways to enjoy what they love. It really is that simple.”
  4. John Funge, cofounder and CEO of BrightContext talks about the “modern problem of “’real-time big data’”. He too calls for more differentiation and ‘ambition’ from second screen players.
  5. MarketsandMarkets projects social TV growth from $151.14 billion this year, to $256.44 billion by 2017.
  6. Nicholas Barr takes apart that projection line by line. 

There’s much more happening in the news this week. As always, keep reading for all the latest stories! Read the rest of this entry »


Social TV Week in Review: Times Are A Changin’

If you’re tuned in to the TV space there are a lot of great things to watch. More and more, networks are releasing their shows early or exclusively via online platforms (The Mindy Project on Hulu, Ben and Kate on Facebook, Smash on iTunes, Suit Up on Yahoo!, Raising Hope on Twitter etc.). Á la Alan Wurtzel’s ‘billion-dollar Olympic experiment’, many are betting that the online buzz from the type A viewer will drive ratings around linear debuts. It’s an interesting new delivery model that has networks testing their limits in the digital age.

The traditional networks aren’t the only ones experimenting…

Amazon, YouTube, Netflix, Hulu, even Xbox and Nintendo, are all looking to create their own content and move it across their own channels. When Netflix launched Lilly Hammer they didn’t just release a single episode premiere, they dumped the entire season online, all in one go. Companies like Netflix don’t have to play by the same rules as ad supported networks, nor do they have to mimic subscription cable services such as HBO.

It doesn’t stop at delivery…

As new players enter the space, they continue to shake up the establishment at all levels. YouTube’s director of product management, Shiva Rajaraman, suggests the 15 or 30-second spot is an anachronism of traditional TV. Branded content? Incentivized engagement? – are these the tools of the new marketer?

Apps are fanning the flames…

According to Adweek a new app called Matcha, “has already partnered with Netflix, iTunes, Hulu and Comcast’s Xfinity to provide users with access to 200,000 movie and TV titles they can elect to watch on the big screen or in some cases within the app itself”. When the networks and larger companies leave consumers wanting more, nimble start-ups rush to fill the gaps. Second screen experiences are moving beyond check-ins and sharing, to now offering discovery, recommendation, personalization and even their own original content.

For more of the latest and greatest news, keep reading!  Read the rest of this entry »


SocialTV Week in Review: Making Ads Relevant

This week Ad Age reported that Allstate would leverage consumer data gathered by Experian, Epsilon and AxiCom against data from Dish and DirecTV subscribers for the purpose of targeting and delivering ads strictly to renters. ‘Addressable ads’, as they are being called, are the latest implementation of big data to optimize ad spends.

In the same week Mindshare proclaimed, “Social TV heralds a new era of TV advertising where interruption and disruption is replaced by relevance and added value”. Social networks have a great ability to surface recommendations and deliver personalized content in an organic and low cost manner; that makes social data another important element in targeting consumers.

At the intersection of consumer data, set top box data and social data, ads are becoming more relevant than ever. As consumers continue to search and shop from mobile devices, location data will play a greater role as well.

Of course, digesting all these data, developing the mechanics to weigh all the variables and finally deliver the right ad, at the right time, in the right place is no easy feat. Still, the growing wealth of information we have at our disposal, to shape the creative and pinpoint the audience, makes it an exciting time for TV and advertising.

Read the rest of the Social TV news below: Read the rest of this entry »


Social TV Week in Review: The News!

No time to write this week, but here (as always) are links to to some of the biggest stories. Read on for more general news and new research. Don’t miss stories on Facebook, Google, Apple, Twitter, TVGuide, apps and networks! Read the rest of this entry »